Henry James // Portrait of a Lady

"... It occurred to me that it would be a kindness to take her about and introduce her to the world. She thinks she knows a great deal of it—like most American girls; but like most American girls she's ridiculously mistaken."- Mrs. Touchett

Henry James // Portrait of a Lady

Ralph: "Do you mean she's a gifted being?"Mrs. Touchett: "I don't know whether she's a gifted being, but she's a clever girl—with a strong will and a high temper. She has no idea of being bored."

Proverbs 4:23-27 NCV

Be careful what you think, because your thoughts run your life.Don't use your mouth to tell lies; don't ever say things that are not true. Keep your eyes focused on what is right, and look straight ahead to what is good. Be careful what you do, and always do what is right. Don't turn off the road of goodness; keep away from evil paths.

Catullus - da mi basia mille

1 Vivamus, mea Lesbia, atque amemus,2 rumoresque senum severiorum 3 omnes unius aestimemus assis! 4 soles occidere et redire possunt; 5 nobis, cum semel occidit brevis lux, 6 nox est perpetua una dormienda. 7 da mi basia mille, deinde centum, 8 dein mille altera, dein secunda centum, 9 deinde usque altera mille, deinde centum; 10 dein, cum milia multa fecerimus, 11 conturbabimus illa, ne sciamus, 12 aut ne quis malus invidere possit 13 cum tantum sciat esse basiorum.

Val Emmich // "Audience"

just wanted art that’s truejust want to talk about the blues

there’s no one left in the audience. everybody wants to be in the show. so what am I doing here? i don’t know.

had a picture in my mind but it’s gotten harder over time to hold on to that dream.

Val Emmich // "Like Minded"

it seems the older i geti’m stuck with the people i’ve met only strangers get why i’m upset the like minded

i get lonely as can be searching for somebody like me understands without having to speak the like minded

Atticus Finch // To Kill a Mocking Bird // Harper Lee

[People are] certainly entitled to think that [they’re right and I’m wrong], and they’re entitled to full respect for their opinions, but before I can live with other folks I’ve got to live with myself. The one thing that doesn’t abide by majority rule is a person’s conscience.

Eleanor Roosevelt

When will our consciences grow so tender that we will act to prevent human misery rather than avenge it? You get more joy out of the giving to others, and should put a good deal of thought into the happiness you are able to give.

When you cease to make a contribution, you begin to die.

A mature person is one who does not think only in absolutes, who is able to be objective even when deeply stirred emotionally, who has learned that there is both good and bad in all people and all things, and who walks humbly and deals charitably with the circumstances of life, knowing that in this world no one is all-knowing and therefore all of us need both love and charity.

Epicurus

of all the things that wisdom acquiresfor the blessedness of life, the greatest by far is friendship.

Lloyd Dobbler // Say Anything...

I don’t want to sell anything, buy anything, or process anything as a career. I don’t want to sell anything bought or processed, or buy anything sold or processed, or process anything sold, bought, or processed, or repair anything sold, bought, or processed. you know, as a career, I don’t want to do that.

Milan Kundera // The Unbearable Lightness of Being

"In the sunset of dissolution, everything is illuminated by the aura of nostalgia, even the guillotine." (4) "The heavier the burden, the closer our lives come to the earth, the more real and truthful they become." (5)

"We can never know what we want, because, living only one life, we can neither compare it with our previous lives nor perfect it in our lives to come." (8)

"...metaphors are dangerous. Metaphors are not to be trifled with. A single metaphor can give birth to love." (11)

"The reason I like you, ... is you're the complete opposite of kitsch. In the kingdom of kitsch you would be a monster." (12)

"...spending the night together was the corpus delicti of love." (13)

"A person who longs to leave the place where he lives is an unhappy person." (27)

"On Saturday and Sunday, he felt the sweet lightness if being rise up to him out of the depths of the future. On Monday, he was hit by a weight the likes of which he had never known. The tons of steel of the Russian tanks were nothing compared with it. For there is nothing heavier than compassion. Not even one's own pain weighs so heavy as the pain one feels with someone, for someone, a pain intensified by the imagination and prolonged by a hundred echoes." (31)

"...just make someone who has fallen in love listen to his stomach rumble, and the unity of body and soul, that lyrical illusion of the age of science, instantly fades away." (40)

"If a mother was Sacrifice personified, then a daughter was Guilt, with no possibility of redress." (44)

"Chance and chance alone has a message for us. Everything that occurs out of necessity, everything expected, repeated day in and day out, is mute. Only chance can speak to us." (48)

"Necessity knows no magic formulae--they are all left to chance. If a love is to be unforgettable, fortuities must immediately start fluttering down to it like birds to Francis of Assisi's shoulders." (49)

"...her nascent love inflamed her sense of beauty, and she would never forget that music. Whenever she heard it, she would be touched. Everything going on around her at that moment would be haloed by the music and take on its beauty." (51)

"[Human lives] are composed like music. Guided by his sense of beauty, an individual transforms a fortuitous occurrence (Beethoven's music, death under a train) into a motif, which then assumes a permanent place in the composition of the individual's life." (52)

"Without realizing it, the individual composes his life according to the laws of beauty even in times of great distress." (52)

"...it is right to chide man for being blind to such coincidences in his daily life. For he thereby deprives his life of a dimension of beauty." (52)

"The dreams were eloquent, but they were also beautiful. That aspect seems to have escaped Freud in his theory of dreams. Dreaming is not merely an act of communication (or coded communication, if you like); it is also an aesthetic activity, a game of the imagination, a game that is a value in itself. Our dreams prove that to imagination -- to dream about things that have not happened -- is among mankind's deepest needs. Herein lies the danger. If dreams were not beautiful, they would quickly be forgotten." (59)

"...vertigo is something other than the fear of falling. It is the voice of the emptiness below us which tempts and lures us, it is the desire to fall, against which, terrified, we defend ourselves." (60)

"On the surface, an intelligible lie; underneath, the unintelligible truth." (63)

"... when the strong [are] too weak to hurt the weak, the weak [have] to be strong enough to leave." (75)

"She longed to do something that would prevent her from turning back to Tomas. She longed to destroy brutually the past seven years of her life. It was vertigo. A heady, insuperable longing to fall." (76)

"We might also call vertigo the intoxication of the weak. Aware of his weakness, a man decides to give in rather than stand up to it. He is drunk with weakness, wishes to grow even weaker, wishes to fall down in the middle of the main square in front of everybody, wishes to be down, lower than down." (76)

"No, it was not superstition, it was a sense of beauty that cured her of her depression and imbued her with a new will to live. The birds of fortuity had alighted once more on her shoulders. There were tears in her eyes, and she was unutterably happy to hear him breathing at her side." (78)

"...fidelity deserve[s] pride of place among the virtues: fidelity [gives] a unity to lives that would otherwise splinter into thousands of split-second impressions." (91)

"Noise has one advantage. It drowns out words." (94)

"Music was the negation of sentences, music was the anti-word!" (94)

"That darkness was pure, perfect, thoughtless, visionless; that darkness was without end, without borders; that darkness was the infinite we each carry within us." (95)

"A man with closed eyes is a wreck of man." (95)

"Beauty in the European sense has always had a premeditated quality to it. We've always had an aesthetic intention and a long-range plan. That's what enabled Western man to spend decades building a Gothic cathedral or a Renaissance piazza. The beauty of New York rests on a completely different base. It's unintentional. It arose independent of human design, like a stalagmitic cavern. Forms which are in themselves quite ugly turn up fortuitously, without design, in such incredible surroundings that they sparkle with a sudden wondrous poetry." (101)

"Unintentional beauty. Yes. Another way of putting it might be 'beauty by mistake.' Before beauty disappears entirely from the earth, it will go on existing for a while by mistake. 'Beauty by mistake'--the final phase in the history of beauty." (101)

"Culture is perishing in overproduction, in an avalanche of words, in the madness of quantity." (103)

"... there was something that bound the bankers to beggers: a hatred of beauty." (109)

"The endless vanity of speeches and words, the vanity of culture, the vanity of art." (110)

"... beauty is a world betrayed." (110)

"There are things that can be accomplished only by violence. Physical love is unthinkable without violence." (111)

"...in the mind of woman for whom no place is home the thought of an end to all flight is unbearable." (125)

"...loves are like empires: when the idea they are founded on crumbles, they, too, fade away." (169)

"Is it better to shout and thereby hasten the end, or to keep silent and gain thereby a slower death?" (222)

"Love is the longing for the half of ourselves that we have lost." (239)

Haruki Murakami // Sputnik Sweetheart

"Ever since that day, Sumire's private name for Miu was Sputnik Sweetheart. Sumire loved the sound of it. It made her think of Laika, the dog. The man-made satellite streaking soundlessly across the blackness of outer space. The dark, lustrous eyes of the dog gazing out the tiny window. In the infinite loneliness of space, what could the dog possibly be looking at?" (8) "... thrown out - penniless, without the necessary social skills - into the wilderness of a somewhat humorless reality." (11)

"Sumire was silent for a good ten, fifteen seconds. 'You're not just saying that to make me feel better, to cheer me up, are you?' 'No, I'm not. It's an undeniable fact, plain and simple.' 'Like the Moldau River?' 'You got it. Just like the Moldau River.' 'Thank you,' Sumire said. 'You're welcome,' I replied. 'Sometimes you're just the sweetest thing. Like Christmas, summer vacation, and a brand-new puppy all rolled into one.' Like I always do when somebody praises me, I mumbled some vague reply. 'But one thing bothers me,' Sumire said. 'One day you'll get married to a nice girl and forget all about me. And I won't be able to call you in the middle of the night whenever I want to. Right?' 'You can always call me during the day.' 'Daytime's no good. You don't understand anything, do you.' 'Neither do you,' I protested. 'Most people work when the sun's up and turn out the light at night and go to sleep.' But I may as well have been reciting some pastoral poems to myself in the middle of a pumpkin patch." (51-52)

"'I understand what you mean by precarious. Sometimes I feel so - I don't know - lonely. The kind of helpless feeling when everything you're used to has been ripped away. Like there's no more gravity, and I'm left to drift in outer space. With no idea where I'm headed.' 'Like a little lost Sputnik?' 'I guess so.'" (63)

alice // disney’s alice in wonderland ★

if i had a world of my own everything would be nonsense. nothing would be what it is because everything would be what it isn’t. and contrariwise, what it is, it wouldn’t be and what it wouldn’t be, it would..